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INTRODUCTION TO DECORATIVE ARTS (IDA)

 

Duration: 10 consecutive weeks (not including holidays/breaks)
Days: Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays
Time: 9:30am – 5:00pm

Overview: Students will learn fundamental components of surface preparation, color theory, glazing techniques, faux finishes, transfer techniques, plaster and troweling finishes, gilding, stamping, stenciling, and gilding. This course is designed to enable students to see, understand, and analyze the foundational aspects of the decorative arts and the creative process more deeply. Understanding the above elements and principles will help students begin to develop technical skills and concepts. Field trips to museums, show houses, and historic houses may be included in order to provide context for skills learned in the classroom.

 


 

ADVANCED DECORATIVE ARTS (ADA)

 

Prerequisite Course: Introduction to Decorative Arts (IDA)

Duration: 26 consecutive weeks (not including holidays/breaks)
Days: Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays
Time: 9:30am – 5:00pm

Overview: This course is designed with a pre-vocational focus. Coursework emphasizes three primary areas of production: wall treatments/decorative finishes, hand-painted wallpaper, and three-dimensional projects. Students will continue to learn comprehensive decorative techniques and typically explore a different skill each week. Practical skills such as measuring, drawing to scale, calculating square and linear footage, and maintaining professional job etiquette are taught alongside decorative techniques that revisit and build upon elements from IDA. Topics include advanced drawing methods, more complex faux finishes, stamp carving, mold making and casting, wall treatments, Venetian plaster, hand-printed wallpaper design and production, flat design, and color matching. Students execute several in-depth individual projects, including the design and production of unique hand-printed wallpapers, gilding objects, and creating a mold from which bookends, molding sample, or other small objects is cast in plaster. Field trips to cultural institutions and designer installations may be included to further enable students to see the decorative arts in context and gain an understanding of what they can achieve in their career specialty.